Learning Futures Senior Consultants Samantha Carruthers, Louise Maddock and Jude Williams recently presented at national and international conferences, sharing their practice with the wider Higher Education community.


HERDSA (July 2018)

The Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) conference is held annually, and was in Adelaide this year. Our colleagues facilitated roundtable discussions on the topics Academic futures: Personalised, role-based professional learning to develop and enhance learning and teaching capabilities and The Evolution of the Griffith Learning and Teaching Capabilities Framework. These thought provoking discussions prompted enthusiastic interest from participants and were an opportunity to share the Griffith Learning and Teaching Capabilities Framework with a wider audience.

Williams, J., Maddock, L. & Carruthers, S. (2018, July) Academic futures: Personalised, role-based professional learning to develop and enhance learning and teaching capabilities. Roundtable discussion held HERDSA 2018 (Re) Valuing Higher Education 2-5 July 2018 Adelaide Convention Centre

Williams, J., Maddock, L. & Carruthers, S. (2018, July). The Evolution of the Griffith Learning and Teaching Capabilities Framework. Roundtable discussion held HERDSA 2018 (Re) Valuing Higher Education 2-5 July 2018 Adelaide Convention Centre

One of Griffith’s poster presentations was also acknowledged at HERDSA (congrats, Paula Myatt!)


Learning Leaders in Higher Education (June 2018)

Samantha Carruthers and Louise Maddock co-facilitated two well received sessions at this conference, held in Melbourne. You can access the abstracts and slides from these sessions below.

Leading Learning & Teaching at the program-level: Developing practice informed approaches for continuing professional learning

With a growing emphasis on evidencing degree-program quality in Australian universities, there is increased value for academic learning leaders to develop curriculum leadership capabilities that enable ongoing enhancements to learning and teaching in their program.  How do we enable context-specific practice-informed continuing professional learning for academics leading learning and teaching?

By reconceptualising academic work as professional practice (Boud & Brew, 2013), this paper will present examples of developing practice-informed participatory action research approaches that aim to provide context-specific (site-based) continuing professional learning for academic learning leaders.  In addition, this presentation will explore the challenges of locating academic continuing professional learning in practice rather than individual development, and the challenges that adopting a practice perspective poses for those supporting the professional learning of academics.

This presentation explores the theme of leadership development in learning and teaching.

Maddock, M. & Carruthers, S. (2018, June) Leading Learning & Teaching at the program-level: Developing practice informed approaches for continuing professional learning. Roundtable discussion held Council of Australasian University Leaders in Learning and Teaching (CAULLT), Learning Leaders in Higher Education Conference, Melbourne

 

Trees falling in forests: Evidencing leadership of learning and teaching, within a system of distributed leadership

Committed to building leadership for learning, Griffith has focused on developing Program Director role, to enhance program (degree) quality and to strengthen organisational leadership.  Since 2014, a program of activities has shifted the program leaders’ identity from being an administrator and coordinator to being a director and leader.

This presentation will briefly describe the approach taken to facilitate this identity shift and then shares lessons learnt.  The theme for discussion relates to identity – the challenge of claiming recognition as leader, within a system where leadership is distributed. “How can I say I led (that) when it was a team effort?”. “Who am I to put my hand up and say my leadership resulted in (that particular outcome).” For some, claiming leadership feels contradictory to their values of collegiality.  It challenges their academic identity.  Such intrapersonal conflict can be a barrier for leaders’ development, recognition and progression.

Discussing this theme goes towards understanding how to frame and articulate leaders’ contributions to shared learning and teaching outcomes, within a distributed system, in order to strengthen the identity of learning and teaching leaders.

Carruthers, S. & Maddock, M. (2018, June) Trees falling in forests: Evidencing leadership of learning and teaching, within a system of distributed leadership. Roundtable discussion held at Council of Australasian University Leaders in Learning and Teaching (CAULLT), Learning Leaders in Higher Education Conference, Melbourne