Visiting Fellow Peter Layton

An alternative to the rules-based order?

There’s a fundamental problem in Australia’s relationship with China: China’s growth advances prosperity but menaces security. If the rules-based order construct does not suit volatile times—and… Read More

Contested skies: Our uncertain air superiority future

In war, there’s a constant to and fro. At times defence dominates, at other times offence. Technologies arise and fall. Disruption rules. This is noticeably… Read More

Why Australia should consider sharing nuclear weapons

The future looks ominous. There are grim warnings that Australia’s strategic situation has worsened dramatically, with major power conflict increasingly likely. Some… Read More

Free trade with Chinese characteristics: Let the buyer beware

Canada will seek a free trade agreement with China – only the timing is uncertain. Integrating with the world’s largest economy (in purchasing power parity… Read More

Other peoples’ air power: Air power with Chinese characteristics

Peter Layton’s series on other peoples’ air power has included an examination of Islamic State’s use of unmanned aircraft and the employment of air power in… Read More

How should Australia defend itself against a rising China?

The rise of China is the big international relations issue of our time. Unsurprisingly then, various solutions have been suggested to the strategic concerns China… Read More

Reading between the lines of North Korea’s letter

The Foreign Affairs Committee of the DPRK Supreme People’s Assembly has been busy sending open letters to various foreign parliaments. Our letter seems specifically… Read More

Other peoples’ air power: Air superiority without fast jets

Say ‘air superiority’ and people instinctively think of highly manoeuvrable aircraft, silk-scarfed fighter pilots, the Battle of Britain and perhaps Top Gun. That is all… Read More

On a Trumpian track for the next Middle East war

In some respects, US President Donald Trump and the Iranian theocratic regime deserve each other. Neither respect international agreements, except when it suits their purposes. Read More

Commercial drones: Privatising air power

In irregular wars, the state has traditionally had a monopoly on the use of air power. This has now been overturned. With the rise of small, … Read More